Emma Chamberlain only became really famous on YouTube about 2 years ago, but she’s made such a big impact that it feels like she’s been there forever. One of the things that makes her fanbase stick around forever is her distinctive video editing style – it might not be too much, but the quirks she adds to her videos make all the difference.

Emma’s videos are great examples of simple, effective, addictive YouTube vlogging. And they’re often shot on a phone camera, so you can make similar videos yourself! You just need to know the right process, the right tools, and a couple tricks to edit your videos to perfection. Here’s what you’ll need to know:

1. Film everything – frontcam is fine
2. Big cuts are good; small cuts are bad
3. Use filters, zooms, & speed adjustments
4. Don't sweat the details

1. Film everything – frontcam is fine

You might think that in order to be a successful YouTuber, you need to have a full, fancy YouTuber setup for filming. That's not true. Though Emma and most YouTubers like her have better setups that they use for some purposes, the majority of Emma's time on camera is shot without any fancy setup.

Filming everything means leaving your camera on for everything that could possibly be relevant to your video. Emma doesn't always do a great job of this herself, but it's important to do if you want your videos to have the same sort of appeal. Film yourself in private spaces, in public spaces, even in places where you're not supposed to be filming.

2. Big cuts are good; small cuts are bad

Some of the most important moments in your vlog videos could be the silent spaces in between words. Awkward silences are great – leave them. You can always add crickets, etc. Never cut things out for the sake of smoothness, only for the sake of narrative.

Which brings us to bigger jump cuts. Emma's videos tend to run under 15 minutes long, but are typically filmed over the course of a full day – this means that big jump cuts are needed to stitch the narrative of the video together. So while long pauses and awkward bits should be left in, it's perfectly fine to cut out a whole portion of your day, even if you filmed for hours, in order to keep the narrative going.

3. Use filters, zooms, & speed adjustments

NOT aesthetic filters – leave those behind. Emma loves to use wacky, weird filters for certain parts of the video that have a certain attitude. Wavy filters, black & white, deep-frying, bug-eyes – all types of video effects can add to the editing style of your video.

There are tons of other quirky video effects that add a bunch of distinctiveness to Emma's vlogging style. Throughout your video, zoom in on awkward moments and small details. Speed up boring or repetitive parts, and slow down some parts of speech that are especially funny or awkward. Pitch your speech up or down an octave to change things up a bit. Nothing is out of the question, as long as it's a little bit unexpected, quirky, and authentic.

4. Don't sweat the details

Some vloggers make sure to have an exact plan for their video's activity, location, schedule, and filming style. Emma Chamberlain is not one of these vloggers. If you're using her videos as a touchstone for your own, each of your videos should have only the basic scaffolding of a plan, and the details should be filled in as you go.

A good place to start would be to simply pick a title for your video – that's probably as much planning as you'll need. If your video plan is a little specific, like "Trying out the 10 best hamburgers in Chicago," then you'll need a little more, like a list of the 10 burger shops you'll be going to. But everything else? Leave it up to chance.


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